Preparing for a Doctor’s Appointment: 6 Tips for Your Patients

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HealthWare Systems Blog

Preparing for a Doctor’s Appointment: 6 Tips for Your Patients

Posted on Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Educating your patients and their caregivers about preparing for a doctor’s appointment can benefit all parties involved.  Patient preparation for doctor’s appointments improves patient engagement, produces better health outcomes, saves doctors time, keeps appointments on schedule, and improves the revenue cycle.

These tips for preparing for a doctor’s appointment will benefit both patients and providers.

These tips for preparing for a doctor’s appointment will benefit both patients and providers.

 

Provide your patients with these tips for preparing for a doctor’s appointment:

 

1.      Complete all forms before you arrive. – Call ahead and find out if there are any forms you need to fill out before your appointment.  Instead of completing documentation in the waiting room, fill it out at home.  This ensures you have plenty of time to finish without delaying your appointment.  Plus, at home you will have access to any documents and information the forms ask for, which can be hard to remember on the spot.  Also, don’t forget to bring your photo ID and insurance card (especially if you have a new Medicare card).

2.      Bring a list of everything you are taking. – This includes any prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, supplements, herbal remedies, and vitamins.  You may want to bring in the actual bottles or containers as well so that your doctor can quickly find the information he/she needs.

3.      Anticipate questions the doctor is likely to ask. – If you prepare answers ahead of time, you can conduct a more efficient appointment and avoid wasting precious minutes trying to recall when your symptoms started, for example.  You can find a list of common questions here.

4.      Write down your questions in order of priority. – It can be easy to forget questions if you haven’t created a list.  Start by asking the most important questions first, to make sure you get to them.  Bring a pen and paper to write down the doctor’s answers.

5.      Practice what you want to say. – Taking the time before your doctor’s appointment to state your concerns out loud can help you remember them and stick to the point.  It can also make you more comfortable discussing personal and potentially embarrassing matters with the doctor so that you can resist any temptation to stretch or withhold the truth, which will impede your care.

6.      Bring someone with you to the appointment. – This is especially useful if you are preparing for a doctor’s appointment that involves a serious, emotionally difficult issue.  A friend or relative can remind you of the concerns you want to address, bring up appropriate follow-up questions, and remember the doctor’s answers and instructions, freeing you from these burdens during what can be an emotional time.


Patient preparation for doctor’s appointments is mutually beneficial for both providers and patients.  These tips for preparing for a doctor’s appointment can help your patients maximize their limited time with the doctor and ensure they cover everything they wanted to discuss.  Preparing for a doctor’s appointment also keeps patients on schedule, allowing providers to serve more patients and improve the revenue cycle.


By Stephanie Salmich

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Male Patient Engagement: Improving Men’s Health Outcomes

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HealthWare Systems Blog

Male Patient Engagement: Improving Men’s Health Outcomes

Posted on Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Improving male patient engagement is a struggle for many providers who find that men are much less likely than women to seek care, whether it be for a specific health concern, preventive healthcare, or standard annual exam.

Consider the following alarming statistics concerning men’s health outcomes:

Men’s Health Network provides these explanations for “The Silent Health Crisis” men are experiencing:

  • “A higher percentage of men have no healthcare coverage.
  • Men make ½ as many physician visits for prevention.
  • Men are employed in the most dangerous occupations, such as mining, fire fighting, construction, and fishing.
  • Society discourages healthy behaviors in men and boys.
  • Research on male-specific diseases is under funded.
  • Men may have less healthy lifestyles including risk-taking at younger ages.”
Improving male patient engagement is critical to improving men’s health outcomes.

Improving male patient engagement is critical to improving men’s health outcomes.
Start your commitment today.

June is Men’s Health Month.  Men’s Health Month presents an opportunity for healthcare facilities to address the epidemic of poor male patient engagement.  Men’s Health Network offers many ideas for promoting Men’s Health Month and improving male patient engagement and men’s health outcomes, including:

In addition, hospitals should educate male patients about their payment options.  Costs may deter male patients from seeing a doctor, and they may not realize that they could be eligible for free or low-cost screenings through their insurance carrier, Medicare, or financial assistance programs.

Healthcare facilities should also make the issues of improving male patient engagement and men’s health outcomes top priorities all year long.  A great example for providers is the work of Dr. Paul Turek (an international leader in men’s health who boasts a 90+% patient engagement rate).  Dr. Turek’s blog lists his suggestions and rules for improving male patient engagement.

Men’s health outcomes affect not only the men and boys in all our lives, but also their families and the women who love them.  Through improving male patient engagement providers can benefit families and their community by improving men’s health outcomes, all while boosting revenue (in the form of more appointments kept by, and more preventive screening tests administered to, male patients).

You can also find ideas for promoting other health observances throughout the year here, and a detailed calendar of this year’s health observances and recognition days here.


By Stephanie Salmich

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